Dog

Keith Haring

Haring's art and life typified youthful exuberance and fearlessness. While seemingly playful and transparent, Haring dealt with weighty subjects such as death, sex and war, enabling subtle and multiple interpretations.

Throughout his tragically brief career, Haring refined a visual language of symbols, which he called icons, the origins of which began with his trademark linear style scrawled in white chalk on the black unused advertising spaces in subway stations. Haring developed and disseminated these icons far and wide, in his vibrant and dynamic style, from public murals and paintings to t-shirts and Swatch watches. His art bridged high and low, erasing the distinctions between rarefied art, political activism and popular culture.

Artist
Keith Haring (1958-1990)
Title
Dog
Medium
Lithograph on BFK Rives paper
Date
1986-7
Size
45 5/8 x 35 3/8 in : 116.0 x 89.8 cm (the full sheet)
Edition
An artist's proof aside from the edition of 40 and aside from the 10 further artist's proofs inscribed 'AP'
Inscriptions
Signed, dated and annotated 'EA' in red pencil
Publisher
Edition Schellmann, Munich and New York
Provenance
Acquired directly from the publisher by the previous owner
Literature
Klaus Littman, pp. 48-49 ; Jörg Schellmann, ed., Forty Are Better Than One, Munich/New York, 2009, pp. 142-143
Reference
A20-42
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